It comes as no news that Windows 10 will likely be a game changer for Microsoft. The team at Microsoft is taking on board comments and feedbacks from the Windows Insider program all in an attempt to improve user experience of Windows 10. Of particular interest is the UI. Users are not happy with the ‘antiquated’ interface of the desktop mode of Windows and they have made this known through the program.

Already users have taken it upon themselves to design what they want the new interface to look like. Amongst the various options making rounds on the internet is this sleek design posted by an anonymous insider (Read comments on the image here)

The image has attracted a lot of attention with the general conclusion being in along the line that the interface is sleek and refreshing.

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  We wondered how Appymouse would fit into the new designs.

 What now for Appymouse?

Seeing that Microsoft is moving forward with the desktop design, we wondered how Appymouse would fit into the new designs.

One thing is certain, the current problem of desktop icons being too small and subsequently becoming difficult to pick will diminish as more desktop software gets optimised for touch screen devices. That said, we still have the Gorilla arm. As this is a direct by product of the human hand interaction with device, this is a problem independent of any designs. Rather one that can be solved or at least mitigated by offering a new approach to the touch experience.

We took the mock designs further by testing how Appymouse stands on the new designs.

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 If it’s a desktop environment, it’s built for productivity. If it’s built for productivity, the tools to make productivity happen needs to be readily visible and assessable. We can’t have it both ways. 

Interesting to note is that many of the featured mockups were designed exclusive of a mouse pointer- despite the designs being for the desktop. Perhaps this is due to the current insatiable sentiments of designers wanting the OS to look modern while still functional.

It is worth reminding the designers and those sharing this sentiment though that if it is a desktop environment, it is built for productivity. If it is built for productivity, the tools to make productivity happen need to be readily visible and assessable. We can’t have it both ways.